Yamato 2520 OST?

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Fri Apr 04, 2014 6:21 am

  • Since the Yamato 2520 Original Soundtrack is long out of production, is there a source for a used copy or a download? Thanks in advance!
    ihphobby
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Sat Apr 12, 2014 3:26 pm

Tue Apr 22, 2014 4:33 am

  • Keep in mind you'd most likey have to go through a buying agent to get it for you as the Japanese Amazon marketplace usually only ships within Japan.
    Dan George
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    DanGeorge
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Wed Apr 23, 2014 5:48 am

  • Keep in mind, while you may see listings for 3 soundtracks for Yamato 2520, there's really only 2.

    There's a 'regular' and 'special' version of the first CD, the difference is the special version has a sleeve around the jewel case which holds a booklet which is kind of nice, filled with Syd Mead paintings and such like. Sony SRCL 3118

    The actual soundtrack is Sony SRCL 3487. It contains a few more tracks compared to the 'rough draft' first CD and to my ear the music is slightly improved. I thought I read back in the day that Kentaro Haneda stepped in to 'tighten' the music. He appears to be credited with conducting the players for the actual 'used in the video' score, and I think you can hear the difference.

    David Matthews was no Akira Miyagawa.
    Steve H
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Wed Apr 23, 2014 5:34 pm

  • Thanks guys. I have the Original Theme Music. What I was looking for was the Original Soundtrack. I saw a few used copies on Amazon Japan at very high prices, but I may go for one if that's the only way to get it. I do have other ways to get stuff from Japan, but I guess it will depend on how badly and how quickly I want it.

    I don't think the music was that bad at all. Not Miyagawa, to be sure, but not the worst thing I've ever heard, either.
    ihphobby
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Thu Apr 24, 2014 1:08 am

  • ihphobby wrote:Thanks guys. I have the Original Theme Music. What I was looking for was the Original Soundtrack. I saw a few used copies on Amazon Japan at very high prices, but I may go for one if that's the only way to get it. I do have other ways to get stuff from Japan, but I guess it will depend on how badly and how quickly I want it.

    I don't think the music was that bad at all. Not Miyagawa, to be sure, but not the worst thing I've ever heard, either.


    Music appreciation is purely subjective, emotional and personal. There is no right or wrong. :)

    OTOH, one can make fairly subjective statements about the MOOD that music conveys in a scene. Does it fit? Does it flow? Does it work with the visuals or against them?

    For me, the music of Yamato 2520 was as misguided as the project itself. It didn't synch well. It was ponderous, even tedious. When it tried to be heroic it came across as tinny, weak. I have no idea why Nishizaki felt he needed to hire Matthews (recording in New York? It was like he HAD to spend way way too much money for not much product), but then again I have no idea why he had to hire Syd Mead, who was fairly out of his element on the project (MHO, of course). It must have been driven by the need to be seen as 'international' or something. Cripes, I bet he could have hired Haneda for music and Izubichi for design for the cost of Syd Mead alone. And THEY would have understood all the unspoken things Nishizaki was trying to convey.

    blah blah blah there I go again. :)
    Steve H
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Fri Apr 25, 2014 10:58 pm

  • i'm of the belief that Nishizaki probably wanted something that was completely different from the original, from the music to the characters to the look and feel. Would one even call it a sequel, in that sense, especially since it didn't refer to hardly anything from the original (aside from a lineage of ships named Yamato, wave motion technology, and the vague character name references of Kodai and Shima)? I also wonder if, knowing how difficult Nishizaki could be, if some animators and designers didn't WANT to be part of it? I understand there was even some friction between Nishizaki and Mead. If this is true, one has to wonder if that all didn't contribute to the overall failure of the project.

    Still, I'm not completely down on 2520, personally. I would have liked to see it completed, if only to see more of the mecha designs and detail of the individual scenes. It's evident that a lot of work went into designing the whole universe portrayed in 2520.
    ihphobby
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Sat Apr 26, 2014 6:30 am

  • Another interesting bit of 2520 gossip that emerged in a recent article I translated (http://ourstarblazers.com/vault/843/) indicated that Nishizaki was very difficult to work for, an extreme micro-manager who created a work environment that nobody enjoyed. Thus, when they got a better offer, the staff moved on. That would absolutely have contributed to missed deadlines that, in addition to tepid sales, brought the whole thing crashing down.

    I still think 2520 is better than most people give it credit for (it really gets cooking in episode 3), and it's super easy to bash for everything it got wrong, but when it was stated by Voyager Japan a couple years ago that 2520 could conceivably be brought back to life, I warmed to the idea instantly. As long as they make it what it SHOULD be, I'm sure it could find its audience.
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    Tim Eldred
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Sat Apr 26, 2014 3:05 pm

  • Tim Eldred wrote:Another interesting bit of 2520 gossip that emerged in a recent article I translated (http://ourstarblazers.com/vault/843/) indicated that Nishizaki was very difficult to work for, an extreme micro-manager who created a work environment that nobody enjoyed. Thus, when they got a better offer, the staff moved on. That would absolutely have contributed to missed deadlines that, in addition to tepid sales, brought the whole thing crashing down.

    I still think 2520 is better than most people give it credit for (it really gets cooking in episode 3), and it's super easy to bash for everything it got wrong, but when it was stated by Voyager Japan a couple years ago that 2520 could conceivably be brought back to life, I warmed to the idea instantly. As long as they make it what it SHOULD be, I'm sure it could find its audience.


    Completely valid, of course, and I can't help but think that 'New Yamato' material you recently won at auction may be exactly that.

    But I do challenge that 'Nishizaki was difficult and micro managing' somewhat, as it flies in the face of all the previous years. Mind, what the truth may well be is, when working with people he doesn't know and aren't 'in synch' with his vision, he could indeed seem difficult. Recall, he pretty much let Matsumoto and Ishiguro do what they wanted as long as they 'hit' the points he was most interested in.

    I recall hearing Syd Mead state that his Yamato had the same 'Ninja Rocketship' aesthetic as the original, and it made me cringe. It was so dismissive and condescending. Imagine you are Nishizaki and you run into that.

    The parallels between Nishizaki and Star Trek's Gene Roddenberry just seem stronger and stronger in my mind.
    Steve H
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 2:56 am

  • Something else to keep in mind is that the majority of the staff on 2520 consisted of young kids who probably weren't steeped in the original and didn't have a built-in affinity for it. So Nishizaki would have to be heavy-handed about things to keep it true to form. There's a way to do that and a way not to. You can either compel or command in a situation like that, and I think he took the "command" tactic.

    The key quote from the article is this one: "I can appreciate passion. But if you intervene after saying that you trust your young staff, that young staff will disappear after finishing one volume.”

    Hayao Miyazaki has been accused of similar heavy-handedness, taking work away from staff to redo it himself, grumbling all the way about them not getting it. Small wonder, if he takes that approach. (In light of this, it's not surprising that he doesn't have anyone to inherit his mantle.) I've been in the same position countless times as a director. When you're up against a tight deadline, the last thing you want to spend time on is schooling someone. But you have to take that hit if you want to break the cycle and survive over the long term.
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    Tim Eldred
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